Tag Archives: Wrasse

Two Endemic Species

What does a Saddle Wrasse have in common with a Hawaiian White-Spotted Toby?  At first glance, they are obviously different in size, shape, and color.  One is a wrasse and one is a pufferfish, can the two really have any similarities?  Well, yes, and it’s more than just one similarity. Advertisements

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Funny fish faces

During the REEF fish survey on Wednesday morning, I snapped a few photos of different reef fish species and marine invertebrates. After going through the photographs from the survey, I noticed that some of the marine critters seemed to either pose for the camera with a nice head shot or hide from camera. Here are […]

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Benthic Survey and Beach Table

Today we unloaded our gear at the beach near Queen’s Beach and set up our beach table.  We had 25 visitors today!  It’s exciting to be able to educate people right on the beach! Heather and I also conducted a benthic survey on the Diamond Head side of the MLCD.  The random point that we […]

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Great volunteer participation with benthic surveys!

Last Friday, we had a total of 4 volunteers help out with our benthic survey!  It was enough people to help our 3 Reef Watch staff complete 2 surveys!  🙂  If you would like to participate, our next survey is tomorrow at 1:00 p.m., please email heather@reefwatchwaikiki.org if you would like to help.

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Rockmover Wrasse

I went snorkeling near the Tongg’s area this weekend and tried out our new Flip UltraHD video camera. We spotted a juvenile Rockmover Wrasse! These wrasses are uncommon in shallow rubble and reef areas. This guy was only in 4 feet of water. They flip over rocks with their heads in search of invertebrates. The […]

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New Quizzes!

This quiz will help you identify some wrasses that you might see in the Waikiki MLCD.  There’s a limit on how much information I can include in a quiz, so please don’t hesitate to contact me if you need further explanations about a species!  🙂

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A mutualistic relationship in Hawaiian waters

Mutualism: a symbiotic relationship that benefits both organisms The Hawaiian Cleaner wrasse is a little fish (about 4 inches long) endemic to the Hawaiian Islands and extremely important for maintaining the health of other reef fish. The brightly colored wrasse establishes cleaning stations in order to remove mucous, scales and ectoparasites from other fish. The […]

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Is that Nemo?

Last week, Ian and another volunteer ventured far off shore of Queen’s Beach to do a REEF survey. In about 15-30 ft of water, the visibility cleared up and Ian took a wonderful picture of some cauliflower coral colonies, a few saddle wrasses and a juvenile yellowtail coris. The juvenile coris has similar markings to […]

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